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  1. The possibility, and very probable reality that you may not get into the program or school of your choice is not talked about enough. A lot of times we hear of the success stories, we talk about our peers admissions and we post about our accomplishments. Very rarely do you see a Facebook post from a friend that says “I didn’t get into engineering!”. There is an obvious reason for this, and that is simply explained by human nature, we don’t celebrate what we perceive to be a ‘failure’ or ‘step backwards’ and I can tell you from experience that I personally felt a bit ashamed and embarrassed to tell my friends and family when I experienced my first rejection letter, but, im here to tell you that you are not alone if you don’t get accepted the first time and in fact everyone should be prepared for this possibility. One site {linked below} suggests that the University of Ottawa, located in Canadas capitol, has an admissions rate of only 15% meaning only 15 of every 100 people who apply will be admitted! The school I attended, Memorial University of Newfoundland, had a 67% admission rate in 2009, much better odds, yes, but I also know that the entrance to specific programs, such as the Faculty of Medicine, is highly competitive and can be as low as 8% some years. So let these stats be a small comfort that it’s not as easy as writing your name on the application, wiring 50$ to the school and boom you’ve landed in a university classroom in the program of your dreams. In reality, there’s a lot of hard work, perseverance, drive, and dedication that may, or may not, stand between you and the school or program. So, my short and simple story, I had great marks in high school and got right into the faculty of engineering, finished engineering with great marks, got a job fairly easy and realized that I wanted t go to Medical school. Chasing my dreams I applied and living in the bubble I was, I got rejected. Didn’t even get an interview! That was the first time I didn’t get what I wanted right away. I was upset and I cried when I got the letter of rejection. I initially thought “How could this be, nobody would be better in this job then me!?”. Then I applied again and REJECTED! Again, I cried and this time I had a whole weekend of self-pity. I got caught up in the idea that too much time would pass and I’d be to old to go back to school, id be really old when I finished school, I thought that my boyfriend would be upset that instead of adding money and starting our life together id be putting myself back into late nights and student debt, my worries went on and on. The problem was I just couldn't stop thinking that this is where I'm suppose to be and what I should be doing, for the long haul. So, it’s okay to be sad and ashamed and most importantly its okay to be rejected, the fact of the matter is that you haven’t failed and its hardly a step backwards. I sat back and evaluated what I needed to do to get in. More importantly, I took a breath and reminded myself how much I have done so far! I have a whole new year to better my application and try again. I am doing what I need to do, for me, that is talking with the admissions officers, paying for a course that can help me better my MCAT score, and redoing my application. For you that may be upgrading your average, adding more volunteer work to your resume, getting a tutor, doing the last course you need for admission. No matter the reason you got rejected, you have put tremendous work in and spent your time, energy and money to try. That effort isnt all lost, in fact its built a foundation for you. Build up and don't throw in the towel, don't let all your effort go to waste. Furthermore, at first talking aloud about these little setbacks to family and friends can be really dang hard! And that's okay. But I encourage you to come to terms with the rejection letter, come to terms with who you are and understand where you need to improve. Know that your rejection letter wasn't because you aren't capable of being a part of said school or said program but instead its because you need to grow and better a certain aspect of your application or portfolio. Once I learned this I didn't feel so awful telling others the truth when the subject came up, in fact, after I stopped avoiding the subject so many of my friends had similar stories! Setbacks make the story of your path to success and happiness that much more interesting! Im not going lie, the rejection stings and in the moment you feel lost, but how are you going to recover from that? Get back up on your horse and keep moving forward because that acceptance letter will feel sooo much better when you know how hard you worked to get it. YOU CAN DO IT. YOU WILL GET THERE. https://www.prepscholar.com/sat/s/colleges/Ottawa-University-admission-requirements#:~:text=The acceptance rate at Ottawa,the school is extremely selective.
    3 points
  2. Hi everyone, What you can do with OR without a psychology degree One could say that I enjoy learning or that I really did not know what I wanted to do with my degree. After my psychology degree, I knew I still wanted to do therapy but I didn’t’ really know how to do it at that point. I still had no idea what social work was (that’s a whole different blog post :)). However, I did find a program that absolutely changed the way that I view the world. This was the Assaulted Women and Children’s Counselling and Advocacy (AWCCA) program at George Brown. Although I had a psychology degree prior to enrolling in this program, it is not necessary as there is a 2-year diploma option along with a fast track option if you have the necessary requirements. AWCCA is a phenomenal program but very specific in who it supports, as noted in the title. This college diploma is a sister program to a social service worker program. Although AWCCA does cover a lot of the same topics, it does so from a feminist and anti-racist lens. Unfortunately, the AWCCA program does not allow you the same options for college registration as the SSW program. Similar to the SWW program, the AWCCA program gives you the opportunity for 1-2 placement opportunities at local agencies to understand how violence shows up in different forms. The AWCCA focuses specifically on supporting individuals who have experienced gender-based violence. The definition of violence covers many different forms from psychological to emotional, to physical and sexual violence. Unfortunately, this is a topic that is all too well known to many female-identifying, trans, non-binary folks and children. This is not to say that men do not experience violence because they absolutely do and their experiences are incredibly valid. However, this focuses specifically on the experiences of gender-based violence. This course opened my eyes to the injustices that I was ignorant about growing up in a predominately white area. This program taught me so much about myself but also how violence is much more common than I expected. This course will teach you about the psychology of gender while giving you the counselling skills to support individuals in times of crisis. This course will encourage you to be engaged in activism while teaching you about the necessary steps to organizing round table conversations or political activist events. This program gave me the opportunity to do my placement at a local refugee shelter, which taught me about the immigration process and how to support individuals who are new to Canada. After I completed this program, I was able to secure a job as a residential counsellor at a local womens’ shelter, supporting women and families who were fleeing violent situations. This is just one of the many opportunities that this program can lead you to! For more information, check out their website and watch their video on the student experience! https://www.georgebrown.ca/programs/assaulted-womens-and-childrens-counselloradvocate-program-awcca-c137
    2 points
  3. One of the main reasons I chose to attend Waterloo was because of the co-op program that was offered to its students, granted it was offered in your program and you were able to keep up a specific GPA. The prospect of working 4-8 months in between my study terms sounded very exciting, as there were a lot of benefits that could be considered: 1) Expanding your network by increasing the number of professionals you meet within your industry 2) Having relevant experiences to add onto your resume 3) Getting to travel to new cities/countries if you chose to work abroad 4) Applying to a variety of jobs to figure out what you are truly interested in 5) Earning money to help pay for tuition, rent, and other finances during university 6) Getting experience with job interviews and resume writing 7) Improving skills that can be applied to any job such as communication, organization, teamwork, etc. With all the benefits of a co-op program in mind, there are also downsides to consider before choosing to apply to one based on my personal experiences: 1) Applying to jobs and preparing for interviews takes a lot of time and effort, especially when this is done during a study term 2) The first co-op term could be extremely difficult - Lack of previous work/volunteering experiences can be a detriment to employers even if you are enrolled in a co-op program 3) Co-op guidelines - Not being able to apply to work that is unpaid (volunteer), mandatory to find a job by a specific deadline, cannot work for family businesses, and other factors that could prevent you from finding opportunities that arise 4) The stress of not receiving interviews or being turned down by an employer can be taxing on mental health during the study term 5) Finding that the job does not meet your expectations Although my own personal experience with co-op was not always easy, I can't speak for everyone. Perhaps you do one interview and get the job on the spot, maybe you apply to 100 jobs and still haven't received any interviews. It's important to remember that you need to focus on yourself and what your personal goals are when deciding on entering a co-op program.
    2 points
  4. It was the summer of 2013, I had just graduated high school and was ready to start my new life as a university student. I was so excited to be living away from home for the first time and experiencing what it would be like to make all of my own choices without requiring permission from my parents such as going out late, eating whatever I wanted, hanging out with my friends, and other typical activities teenagers liked to do. I think a lot of students can relate to the sentiment of living as their own person for the first time and truly figuring out who they are outside of high school and their respective towns. I for one was ready to dive into the full university experience, knowing I was living with a couple of friends from high school, I wasn't too worried about living arrangements. It was myself and three other girls living in a suite divided into four small rooms with a small kitchen, dining area, and living space with two bathrooms. I have to say we got pretty lucky with our living arrangement, as we never went through the experiences of sharing communal bathrooms or living off a meal plan exclusively since we had a kitchen. We were also in a fairly new dorm so it was cleaner, but also one of the few that included A/C so we could stay cool during the first few weeks of September. I thoroughly enjoyed the space and was grateful we got the privacy that other dorms didn't exactly have, but there were definitely a few downsides to the dorm as well. 1) Privacy - I know I stated this as a positive, as it was more quiet than other dorms available at the university, but it also took away from the socialization aspect of the "college experience". To elaborate, each room in our building was its own suite, meaning that you were mostly surrounded by the other three roommates that you had. Unless you actually made an effort to go out and meet the other people living on the floor... you were pretty isolated. Sadly for us, most of the people on our floor kept to themselves, so we didn't get much of a chance to make new friends. 2) THIN WALLS - As someone who is a light sleeper, accustomed to the quiet suburban lifestyle with minimum noises and distractions at night... let's just say I didn't sleep much for the first couple of months. 3) Chores - Splitting up chores is not always easy when it comes to living with a new group of people. Sometimes you need to have difficult conversations about how someone might be slacking in one department, or how you feel like you're doing most of the work. To be honest, I was guilty of slacking in some of my duties as well. University is hard and your schedule gets turned upside down when you have to balance not only your studies, but also cooking for yourself, cleaning, grocery shopping, and finding time to unwind and enjoy the hobbies and extra curricular activities you like to do. My only advice is give yourself time to adjust and hopefully you can figure out a routine that works for you! Those are just some of my experiences living away from home from the first time. Although it wasn't perfect, I still had a great time in first year learning how to live on my own and meeting a lot of new friends in the process. It taught me how to be more independent, balance my schedule, and figure out how to communicate with others about things that bothered me. Living OFF campus is a whole other area I will get into for another post.
    2 points
  5. Hi everyone! If you are reading this post it means you could be interested in a degree in psychology! I am here to help you figure out whether this is the best path for yourself and will hopefully provide a little bit of information that I wish I knew when I was making my career decision. I am 29 years old and finished my degree in Honours psychology in 2014. Growing up, I can remember fondly wanting to be a therapist, one that is depicted in movies with the beautiful office and outfits, supporting individuals and families with their experiences and problems. Truthfully, I wanted to be a psychologist, however, I did not know what this actually meant and really how long the process would take or whether there were other options out there. I picked a university that I ended up loving, but I chose it because my friend’s mom who was a psychologist did her schooling there. I thought well if she did it there it must have an excellent psychology program and quite frankly, it was fine but I did not know what to expect. Although my psychology degree did lay a foundation for my career, it took a college program and now my master’s in social work to get to where I really want to be. Questions I wish I knew prior to going into my psychology degree What can you do with a psychology degree? You can absolutely do many things with a psychology degree, but many will require additional training and education, including a psychologist, social worker, psychotherapist, researcher, or teacher. What’s the difference between a bachelor of arts and a bachelor of science psychology degree? A bachelor of arts focuses more on the humanities and community work including social justice, whereas a bachelor of science focuses more on math and science. This distinction can be very helpful if you are interested in pursuing a psychology degree, specifically in what schools offer which programs. How long does it take to become a trained and licensed psychologist? After obtaining a bachelor’s degree in psychology, you will need to obtain at least a master’s degree if not your Ph.D. and a year of supervised interning prior to becoming a psychologist. According to the Canadian Psychological Association website, it can take between 5-8 years after completing your bachelor’s degree to obtain a Ph.D. in psychology. What does a master’s and Ph.D. require? Although I cannot speak to this completely, I do understand that a master’s and Ph.D. require conducting research. This personally was not something I cared to complete as I did not thrive in a research setting. However- I STRONGLY encourage you to explore what you are interested in. My experience definitely was not what I expected when I went to university. However, I also did not do the research that I should have done. I knew I wanted to do some sort of therapy but I did not understand even the different options that were out there, including a child and youth worker, residential counsellors at local shelters, community organizers among so many more. I hope for you as you explore your next steps is to really reflect and take time to figure out what you really want, utilizing journaling to explore your goals and figure out what that could look like. Have conversations with people who are in that field, ask them how they got there, who inspired them, what courses they found most interesting. Research the different programs at different schools. I can tell you that not every program is the same so figure out what best aligns with your values and goals. Lastly, I know that this time is very confusing but I want to let you know that it is totally OKAY for you not to know what you want to do. Everyone has their own journey and own timeline. However, I would encourage you also to figure out what you want to study prior to committing your valuable time and money to something you hate. Happy exploring!
    2 points
  6. It's important to recognize how much our mental health impacts our overall well-being and quality of life. May 3rd-9th is the CMHA Mental Health Week campaign, where CMHA is encouraging individuals to express and understand their emotions, no matter how uncomfortable they may feel. During this pandemic, many of us have experienced low feelings of depression, anxiety, and isolation, making mental health more important than ever. Throughout my time in university, I struggled a lot with my own mental health due to the constant pressures of trying to balance school work, extracurriculars, social life, co-op jobs, relationships, and other external factors that made up my life during that period. I had many instances where my social anxiety blocked my efforts to improve my life, whether that would be personal or professional. I was constantly stressed and felt like I was underachieving in everything I did thanks to my own perception that others around me were always doing better, and that I was never going to catch up. That was a personal flaw I didn't realize I was doing at the time; instead of worrying about how others were doing, I could've chose to be more mindful and remind myself that I was just fine and how many things I could actually be grateful for. Today I'm a lot more self aware of my emotions and how my past experiences shaped me as a person. Speaking with numerous mental health counsellors, during and after university, taught me how to understand and cope with my emotions in a healthier way. That was a big factor in how my mental health had the chance to progress over the years through the good and bad days. They didn't encourage me to ignore and filter out all the bad things in my life as I had been previously doing, but rather how to cope with the anxiety and impulsive thoughts when they occurred. This is not to say I don't have days where I experience regression. Your mental health journey isn't always going to be linear, and it's okay to take a couple of steps back. I am able to be more self aware of my actions and not let my emotions surpass a threshold where I do or say things I may regret later. Overall, I recommend reaching out to any mental health services your school offers if that is something you feel you can benefit from. I personally find that speaking with a professional can always offer you an unbiased perspective on certain issues, and the feeling of being in a place free of judgement makes me feel safe and more open to talking about things that people in my personal life, such as friends and family members, may not always understand or show compassion for. Not every counsellor is going to be a good fit with what you are looking for, so be open to finding someone else, or even something different if that's what you need. Take care and stay safe!
    1 point
  7. My professor showed this to me in one of my first lecture classes. What is your opinion of this? Do you think it is possible to achieve all three? Lets discuss :)
    1 point
  8. In my experience, I did not have to get a degree in Business in order to go into the Human Resources field. As mentioned in my previous education post, I actually went into Psychology and then after I decided to enrol in a post-graduate certificate in Human Resources Management. Even if you have not gone to university, there are certificates that are not necessarily for post-graduate students but instead just for anyone who is interested in learning more about the Human Resources field and wants to go into it. I do want to mention that because it is fully online, there is not a work experience component and all discussions are done through the forum on the course website. You would only have to go to campus to take the final exam or you can even just take it online and pay for the online proctoring service. I would highly recommend it, but it really depends on whether you are someone who is okay with learning on their own and do not need much guidance from a professor. That said, there are certificates that are not online and can be done normally face-to-face.
    1 point
  9. Hi everyone, Recently, Dr. Simone reached out to us to offer a description of her career as an Educational Psychologist. Hope you all find this informative! "Personally, I was always curious about learning and learners so it made sense to me that I would become an educational psychologist. Educational psychologists are interested in how people (children and adults) learn, the difficulties they might have learning, how the learning environment might hinder or foster learning and what can be done to modify the learning environment so that people can be successful in their learning. Because I also wanted to work in a university environment where I could teach and do research I pursued my doctorate or Ph.D. in Educational Psychology which I received from Michigan State University. As a doctoral student in Educational Psychology, I took courses in statistics, research design, human development, cognition, and instruction. My minor was developmental psychopathology where I studied areas pertaining to mental illness. With respect to my degrees, after 11 years of elementary and high school, I obtained a B.A. in Social Psychology at McGill University which was a three-year program. Then I pursued a two year M.A. with thesis in Educational Psychology (McGill University), and subsequently another four years for my doctoral degree or Ph.D. (Michigan State University). Although I decided to become a professor educational psychologists can also work as consultants outside the domain of academia."
    1 point
  10. Right after high school, I was in UBC Sciences. Over the years, I studied mainly Math. I was pretty good at it, but soon I felt very lost in life. I had no idea what I wanted to do with a Math degree. In the summer of my 2nd year, I fell into a heavy depression. In the coming years, I majored in Psychology in the hopes of understanding myself better and alleviating my depression. That was also the wrong move. I finished my time at UBC after 4 years and was still lost. Eventually, I got a job with my family business and went back to school years later. Lessons 1. Don't rush into University if you are unsure of what you want to do. Take a gap year before or even in between studies. 2. When feeling lost, don't force yourself to finish a degree just because you started it. Take some time to think things over and speak with a counsellor.
    1 point
  11. Hello Everyone, I am currently studying Restaurant Management: Food and Beverage management at George Brown College in Toronto. This program combines the intricacies of the hospitality industry along with the fundamentals of a management course. Towards the end of this program, several graduates, move on to become bartenders/servers, bar-managers, sommeliers, cicerones and many such designations across the hospitality industry. The industry not only includes hotels and restaurants but also airlines, cruises, resorts, clubs, resident homes, wineries, breweries and all those places that require customer service along with F&B services. Some graduates even work towards marketing, sales, accounting and HR aspects of the industry. In this write-up I would be focusing on bartending. It not only involves skills but also technical knowledge of the products and the various techniques that go into creating a drink. There are specific bartending courses/programs as well offered both online as well as in colleges/institutes. Similarly, along this path, people also opt for sommelier/cicerone courses. However, to become one of these, one has to complete certification programs such as WSET and Cicerone certifications. All the three paths stated above require a passion towards customer service and the eagerness to keep learning. These fields like most other keep evolving with time and it's important to stay up to date with what's happening in the industry. Also to be really succeed in this field, one should be able to commit a lot of facts to memory (a bit of history, geography, biology and chemistry) and also be good at the basics of mathematics(addition, subtraction, multiplication and division). There are several professional bartenders who do not undergo a lot of initial in-school training and learn hands-on while in the industry. Anyhow, bartending is a skill that cannot be acquired in a day or a week, it has to be developed over time and requires work. https://www.georgebrown.ca/programs/advanced-wine-and-beverage-business-management-program-postgraduate-h414 https://www.georgebrown.ca/programs/food-and-beverage-management-restaurant-management-program-h132 Hope this piece would prove useful. Best regards, Aprajita
    1 point
  12. Definitely possible to achieve. If I can, I would like to teach all people how you can manage your time and organize daily life. The key is here time management and determination.
    1 point
  13. Due to the rise of MOOC ( massive open online courses), I just have a few thoughts on it especially for students. Many MOOC services such as coursera or edx offers courses that you can audit for free and pay (around 70$) to get a certificate. I recommend anyone to take these courses as they are taught by qualified university professors. These classes you can study at during your own pace, skip to certain topics you want to cover specifically and engage with others via the forum section of the courses. If you want to take a course for your own interests or just for fun, I recommend them as well as many of them are entry topics on languages, professional development and languages. Students should definitely use this to their advantage. In terms of how recognized these certificates, specializations and degrees are, there are mix opinions on that. Please reach out and lets discuss MOOC together!
    1 point
  14. Thought it might make it easier to compile a list of different volunteering sites in Ontario and across Canada and save them all in one place. You might find these helpful if you are currently looking to volunteer within your community or even remotely: SPARK Ontario – You can filter volunteering opportunities by location and/or suitability (i.e. looking for opportunities for anyone, adults, youth, etc.) https://www.sparkontario.ca/ Gigit – You can choose whether you are looking for a volunteer gig, paid gig, events, services or rentals and where. https://gigitmarketplace.com/ Canadian Red Cross – You can find volunteering opportunities depending on the province that you live in and you also have the choice to select a role type and a category. https://www.redcross.ca/ YMCA Canada – Volunteering opportunities may vary depending on location, so their main site advises you to visit your local YMCA site to learn more (they make it easy for you too and actually link all of their branches!) https://ymca.ca/Get-Involved/Volunteer Volunteer Canada – This site works a little bit differently. Instead of letting you search for a particular position, it gives you a list of different local sites that you can visit for more information based on where you are located. For instance, if you are in Ontario and within the GTA, it links you to Volunteer Toronto so you can search for opportunities in that specific area. Or if you are more towards Ottawa, then they also include Volunteer Ottawa and a couple of other sites. Apart from that, Volunteer Canada also gives you the option to fill out a form so you can be matched with possible volunteering opportunities within your preferred location and based on your talents/skills, what cause you are looking to serve and what group of people. You can also choose the duration of the volunteering position and if you are volunteering on your own or with a group. All of this is found in the Pan-Canadian Volunteer Matching Platform tab. https://volunteer.ca/ Charity Village – You can find volunteering opportunities (or even paid positions) just by typing a keyword, job title or the organization’s name as well as selecting a specific location. https://charityvillage.com/ I would also suggest that if you do have something specific in mind you want to do (i.e. helping out with COVID related jobs, helping out newcomers get settled in, etc.) and said job is not showing up on any volunteering site or there is even a specific organization you want to contribute to, you can easily go to your local centres’ websites or reach out to them via email or phone and ask if they have any volunteering opportunities and how would you go about the process. They are always looking for volunteers! I will make sure to keep adding more sites as I come across them but please feel free to comment with any others that were not mentioned that you may know of! 🙂
    1 point
  15. I just want to make a list of what first years need to know or should expect, obviously this does not apply to every university and every program but just generally from most: - Professors generally don't care about first year students, won't bother to remember your name ( unless you do really well in a way) - You will be lost in the campus during your first few weeks so get to your lecture classes early - Books are expensive -Some TAs are good while others have no idea what they are saying - Exams and tests are WAY HARDER than high school - Be ready to memorize, memorize and memorize - Try to make friends in the first year, start building your connection web - You will procrastinate, so try to finish everything early - Always ask questions during your tutorials, your TAs are their for you, don't be shy - use your resources (some people never use the library, tutoring service ever) If anyone feels like something should be added to this list, please do not hesitate to add I welcome any questions or comments
    1 point
  16. Upon completion of high school I really had no idea what I wanted to do in my future, so my university applications were broad. I ended up settling on a BCOMM degree at Ryerson University because there were so many different options. It’s funny because I did not take a single business class in high school, yet that is the career path I decided on. In my first year I decided to go into the Business Technology Management program which balances essential business skills with a focus on Information Technology. I was quite technical in my knowledge of computers so this seemed like a good fit. The program in general begins with all the basic business courses, so if in the first year you decide that the Business Technology route is not for you, the same courses apply to the basic business (BCOMM) degree. This was key because it meant that even if I changed my mind, I still had options within the program without losing out on a year’s worth of courses. I decided to stick with the Business IT degree and was introduced to many different avenues in the years to come. You are exposed to all aspects of each specialization in the coming years and get to decide where you want to focus (IT Security, Networking, Database, etc). Networking and Security became my focus and both assisted me immensely when entering the working world. Upon graduation I used my BCOMM degree to assist me in getting a job as a technical support analyst. Basically, I was responsible for over-the-phone technical support for a large Canadian company that supports the major banks. The critical thinking and knowledge developed through obtaining my university degree were essential for my success in this job. Within my first year I moved on to a new role within the support team. The following year, I was recruited into the IT Security department of the company. One important thing students need to understand is that the most important step is to get your foot in the door. My first job was in no way something I ever expected to do; however, I excelled at it and it provided the platform for my learning about the company, thus positioning me well for other roles in different departments. I highly recommend IT Security for those that think it may interest them. The demand for IT Security professionals is very high. In my next role I was exposed to a myriad of different IT Security landscapes (Architecture, Identity Access Management, Risk Management, Control Testing). Eventually I decided to further my credentials and started studying for the Certified Information Systems Security Profession (CISSP) exam. This is a widely recognized credential that is highly respected in the security industry. After this I decided to get my CISA (Certified Information Security Auditor) certification. Although these certifications took considerable work to prepare for, it was well worth it – especially because most companies encourage continuing education and will pay for these training / certification exams. So in essence you are putting in your free time to position yourself better for growth in the future. Please note that many of these exams are extremely difficult and the best way to prepare for them is to have worked in the security industry. My earlier work experience was a huge asset when I took those exams. It is a lot easier to apply concepts when you are already aware of them / have put them to use in your work career. Both of these certifications strengthened my resumé immensely and the knowledge I took away was priceless. After many years of moving around within the IT Security landscape I moved on to run my own E-Commerce business which I continue doing today. I keep up my security credentials just in case I would like to return to the industry; however, for now I am enjoying being my own boss and growing my business.
    1 point
  17. With a Bachelor of Commerce, you will have the choice of what to major and minor in. I received a Specialist in Finance and Commerce , a Major in Economics, and a Minor in Philosophy. At the time, I felt that this was a good synergistic combination that also included some of my passions (i.e., Philosophy). I didn't necessarily know what I would do with this degree. During my university career, I realized just how much I love working with numbers, and more importantly, analyzing data to enable us to actually make decisions. I loved being presented with a scenario and being asked to make recommendations that optimize the outcome (whether the desired result is to maximize profit/minimize risk/etc). I loved being presented with a problem and coming up with the best most optimal most efficient solution. What also helped me to reach this conclusion was the part-time job I held throughout my university years and the particular aspects I enjoyed about it, as well as the fact that this is how I am in my life in general when it comes to everything I do - I try to challenge the status quo and improve the way I do things. After graduating, I looked for a job that would enable me to do precisely that. However, with a B.Comm, the sky is the limit. It is such a broad and all-encompassing degree so there is a wide variety of things you can do with it. You can also further specialize in something in particular if you so choose. For example, some of my classmates ended up getting their accounting designation. You will learn what you like in the years that you're working towards this degree. Another factor of course will be the types of jobs available upon graduation. One thing to note is - depending on what field you choose to get into, your grades may in fact matter tremendously. In my case, I was able to find a job and move up quickly due to my high GPA. But this is not necessarily true of all jobs.
    1 point
  18. Based on my own educational journey, you do need some post-secondary education when it comes to Psychology. Of course, it also depends on what you are looking to do in the future. If you’re leaning more towards conducting research or becoming a therapist, you’ll definitely need to get a master’s or a PhD and get all the credentials in accordance to the province where you are. On the other hand, if you’re more interested in following a career path outside of ‘psychology’ per se then a post-secondary certificate or a master’s might be enough. Again, it would all depend on your career and what you ultimately hope to do. At an undergraduate level, it is really about first getting either an Honours’ degree (if you’re going to graduate school for Psychology) or a 3-year or 4-year degree if you are looking to go into any other field. Aside from that, it would also depend on what school you choose to go to. When I started my university career, I was not really sure what I wanted to get into later on, but I knew I was more interested in the behavioural aspect of the field as opposed to the research part. Although if you were interested in conducting research, you did have to maintain a certain average from your 2nd year onwards in order to stay in the Honours’ program. However, if you were not interested in research at all, then you could simply do a normal 4-year program. At my university, you were also allowed to do a minor or even a combined major. In my case, I decided to minor in Italian Studies. After I graduated last year, I did decide that I wanted to go into the Human Resources field, so I decided to do a post-graduate certificate in Human Resources Management right after. And I’m currently working towards that.
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