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About Me

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  1. In my experience, I did not have to get a degree in Business in order to go into the Human Resources field. As mentioned in my previous education post, I actually went into Psychology and then after I decided to enrol in a post-graduate certificate in Human Resources Management. Even if you have not gone to university, there are certificates that are not necessarily for post-graduate students but instead just for anyone who is interested in learning more about the Human Resources field and wants to go into it. I do want to mention that because it is fully online, there is not a work experience component and all discussions are done through the forum on the course website. You would only have to go to campus to take the final exam or you can even just take it online and pay for the online proctoring service. I would highly recommend it, but it really depends on whether you are someone who is okay with learning on their own and do not need much guidance from a professor. That said, there are certificates that are not online and can be done normally face-to-face.
  2. As I previously mentioned in my education post in regard to Psychology, you can go a different way if you are not interested in becoming a therapist or a researcher. What I mean by that is that Psychology can be applied to a variety of different fields. Actually, when I was a full-time student, I was also enrolled in my university’s co-op program which allowed me to further develop my skills and gain new ones related to my major while being a student. One of the jobs I had was a specialty camp counsellor and administrator for a not-for-profit organization in my area. As a specialty camp counsellor, I had the opportunity to not only work with individuals of all ages and abilities, but I was also able to put to use all of the knowledge acquired through my Psychology related classes up to that point and learn even more. As an administrator, on the other hand, I was able to make use of my research skills which I had been developing through the different assignments for each course. Most of those classes did require you to conduct in-depth research about the subject at hand. Another job where my degree also came into play was as a summer travel counsellor. Although not necessarily directly related to Psychology, my education did play a big part in it as well as my transferable skills from previous jobs such as the one mentioned above. This particular job allowed me to further develop my communication, active listening, problem-solving and critical thinking skills, all of which were constantly being put to the test in Psychology related courses. As of now, I'm working towards my Human Resources Management certificate to then be able to work in the field as either an HR assistant, generalist, recruiter, etc. All within the same path and all making use of Psychology related theories and concepts.
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